Baranyai: Buy Locally, Canadian to Beat Global Shipping Delays

0

On Thanksgiving, online magazine Quartz ran an article on the supply chain with the ominous headline: “Ruining Christmas.” Pulling readers out of their tryptophan haze, the headline warned, “It’s already too late to ship goods to the United States in time for Christmas.”

Content of the article

On Thanksgiving, online magazine Quartz ran an article on the supply chain with the ominous headline: “Ruining Christmas.” Pulling readers out of their tryptophan haze, the headline warned, “It’s already too late to ship goods to the United States in time for Christmas.”

Advertising

Content of the article

This was just one of many recent stories about the dire state of delayed consumer goods, with shipping containers stranded on both sides of the Pacific. Images of half-empty shelves echoed the great toilet paper panic of 2020. Lollygagging shoppers, beware.

I am not a curmudgeon. I love the holidays, although I would really prefer retailers to keep canned hymns and fake snow until after Remembrance Day. We can afford a little break between pulling down the wispy displays of Halloween cobwebs and throwing in garlands, to give the veterans their due.

The limits of my tolerance are still being tested by people who do their holiday shopping in October. I understand that some people like to finish early, but surely they could keep this organizational feat to themselves.

Advertising

Content of the article

If you’ve already found what to get everyone on your gift list, found each item, and stashed it somewhere hidden away from prying eyes – but not so well hidden that you won’t be able to find them all by December – so congratulations, you win the holidays. No need to poke football.

Getting organized in October meant making an appointment for snow tires and reluctantly putting the barbecue into hibernation. As with most things, however, the pandemic has changed the way we shop.

Many people, who have started working from home, have found themselves sitting on unused vacation funds and savings accumulated from their daily lattes. People stuck in their homes decided to invest their time and treasure in the homes that had become home, office, school, and minimum security prison, all rolled into one.

Advertising

Content of the article

Suddenly, wood became a more coveted commodity than gold. Then, manufacturers struggled to keep up with the demand for bikes and kayaks as people emerged from isolation, pale and blinking in the sun, in search of safe and socially distant outdoor recreation opportunities.

Now we are learning that we can have a long wait ahead of us if we want a new car. Demand for electric vehicles is increasing, but a shortage of chips has caused most manufacturers to cut production. Meanwhile, iPhone 13 shipments have been delayed for weeks, leaving some tech fans apoplectic.

According to maritime research firm Sea-Intelligence, two-thirds of goods shipped to the United States arrive late. The delays are exacerbated by the scarcity of dockworkers to load and unload sea containers.

Advertising

Content of the article

The cost of transporting goods has increased three to four times compared to last October, reports the CBC. Delays affect everything from electronics and clothing to Christmas trees. Out of reach objects float on cargo ships immobilized off the coast of California, brightly colored shipping containers stacked like nested Lego pieces.

The obvious solution is to forgo overseas orders and buy items made in Canada. It won’t solve all the delays – many domestically produced items still depend on parts shipped from China – but it’s a great start. Purchases made in Canada have the additional benefits of supporting the economy, maintaining jobs and reducing our carbon footprint.

These benefits are magnified when we buy hyper-locally, supporting small businesses and artisans in our own communities. Many small retailers have developed online stores to survive the pandemic, providing an alternative to Amazon. Others will arrange contactless delivery or pickup, for customers who prefer to avoid queues and canned holiday music.

[email protected]

Advertising

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Check out our community guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

Share.

Leave A Reply